×
1 579
Fashion Jobs
ESTÉE LAUDER
Global Consumer Marketing Manager jo Malone London
Permanent · London
ESTÉE LAUDER
la Mer - Business Manager - Fenwick, Bracknell - 24 Hours / 4 Days - Part-Time Permanent
Permanent · Bracknell
MARSHALLS
71 Retail lp Detective
Permanent · Los Angeles
LINDA FARROW
Optical Key Account Manager
Permanent · LONDON
LINDA FARROW
After Sales Executive (German And French Speaking)
Permanent · LONDON
LINDA FARROW
Trade Marketing Manager
Permanent · LONDON
SHISEIDO
Bareminerals Account Manager - Boots Bracknell (37.5 Hours)
Permanent · Bracknell
SHISEIDO
Bareminerals Account Manager - Boots Stratford (37.5 Hours)
Permanent · London
SHISEIDO
Nars Business Manager - Fenwick Newcastle (37.5 Hours)
Permanent · Newcastle upon Tyne
SHISEIDO
Account Manager - Boots Hammersmith (22.5 Hours)
Permanent · London
GUCCI LIMITED
Gucci Stock Manager
Permanent · LONDON
NIKE
Purpose Marketing Manager, London
Permanent · London
NIKE
Agile Marketing Manager, London
Permanent · London
ESTÉE LAUDER
Clinique - Consultant - Lisburn, Boots - 30 Hours - Full Time, Permanent
Permanent · Lisburn
ESTÉE LAUDER
Clinique - Consultant - Edinburgh, John Lewis- 37 Hours - Full-Time, Permanent
Permanent · Edinburgh
ESTÉE LAUDER
Demand Planner - The Estée Lauder Companies
Permanent · London
SHISEIDO
Bareminerals Account Manager - Boots, Edinburgh Gyle (30 Hours)
Permanent · Edinburgh
SHISEIDO
Laura Mercier Account Manager - Harvey Nichols Manchester (37.5 Hours)
Permanent · Stretford
SHISEIDO
Bareminerals - Account Manager (30 Hours)
Permanent · Edinburgh
V. F. CORPORATION
Manager, Strategic Accounts - Dickies Emea
Permanent · LONDON
VANS
Credit Controller - Spanish Speaking - Vans
Permanent · CALVERTON
VF INTERNATIONAL
Multilingual Credit Controller - Key Accounts (English Plus Any European Language)
Permanent · CALVERTON
By
Reuters
Published
Feb 26, 2014
Reading time
2 minutes
Share
Download
Download the article
Print
Click here to print
Text size
aA+ aA-

Recent hacks spur new company cyber spending

By
Reuters
Published
Feb 26, 2014

LONDON, United Kingdom - Almost 60 percent of top firms in the United States, Canada, Britain and Australia have boosted their spending on cyber defences following the theft of data of millions of customers from U.S. retailer Target and other big companies, a report said on Tuesday.

Source: Images_of_Money / Flickr


A survey by BAE Systems Applied Intelligence of senior IT officials in companies ranging from banks to mining, technology and law showed U.S. firms already spending 15 percent of their entire IT budgets on improving security. The number looked set to rise.

In the United States, 60 percent of those surveyed said their cyber security budget would increase as a direct result of recent high-profile attacks. That compared to 49 percent in Britain, 54 percent in Canada and 64 percent in Australia.

Between November 27 and December 14, U.S. retailer Target lost details of some 40 million credit and debit card numbers and 70 million customer details to hackers.

Many other firms including banks have also had data stolen either by employees or those who broke into their system from outside.

"New technologies, changing business practices and an increasing reliance on inter-connected critical systems and infrastructure are all increasing our vulnerability to attack," the report said.

"It will be those organisations that truly integrate security intelligence into their operations that will reap the benefits and deliver business growth."

Formerly known as Detica, BAE Systems Applied Intelligence is the cyber arm of the British defence company.

More than 80 percent of those surveyed expected the number of cyber attacks to rise. Loss of customer data was by far the greatest concern, followed by the loss of trade secrets, reputational damage and interruption of service.

In the United States, 29 percent of respondents estimated a successful cyber attack could cost their organisations more than $75 million. Almost half said it could cost more than $15 million.

The assessment of threat varied somewhat by region and industry, the report said. U.S. firms believed intellectual property that was the second greatest threat to their networks after professional fraudsters while in Britain that place was held by activists, and in Australia by "hobbyist" amateur hackers.

© Thomson Reuters 2021 All rights reserved.