Estee Lauder minimises waste with 3D printing

While many beauty brands are turning to technology to improve their retail experience, the Estée Lauder Companies’ is using it in its manufacturing process. 

An example of how 3D printing assists with the creation of a Jo Malone London bottle. - Estée Lauder
 
The beauty giant, which counts brands like MAC, Clinique, Jo Malone and Too Faced among its brand portfolio, has been using 3D printing technology at its UK-based Whitman manufacturing facility enabling the company to overcome several engineering challenges. 
 
The 3D printing technology has allowed Estee Lauder to design and print new parts, jigs and fixtures in-house, in a more time and cost efficient matter, and at the same time reducing waste. 
 
“Although our primary reason for adopting the new 3D printing technology was to keep up with the latest innovation in manufacturing, 3D printing is also helping us to quickly and more effectively problem-solve many more challenges than we ever could have imagined,” explained Chris Lee, Process Engineer at ELC’s Whitman Plant. 
 
With 3D printing, parts are built layer by layer instead of being ‘machined out’ of larger blocks of material where there is waste. 
 
What’s more, Lee further explained that “it’s now possible to design and test new machine parts in hours instead of weeks or months, and for as little as $1.31, or £1.00, per part rather than thousands of pounds."
 
Estee Lauder has been using the technology on its Jo Malone London’s 30 ml fragrance bottles for label alignment of the bottle, as well as part of the assembly of its Advanced Night Repair Recovery Complex to ensure the accurate centering of the glass pipettes before insertion into the bottle.
 
The New York City-based company has previously expressed its interest in taking action to ensure a healthier planet. It pledged in 2016 to achieve a net zero carbon goal by 2020. 

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